misfortune

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+ 368 In poverty and other misfortunes of life, true friends are a sure refuge. The young they keep out of mischief; to the old they are a comfort and aid in their weakness, and those in the prime of life they incite to noble deeds. Aristotle


+ 285 Misfortune shows those who are not really friends. Aristotle


+ 270 The misfortune of the wise is better than the prosperity of the fool. Epicurus


+ 320 Misfortune seldom intrudes upon the wise man; his greatest and highest interests are directed by reason throughout the course of life. Epicurus


+ 295 To accuse others for one's own misfortunes is a sign of want of education. To accuse oneself shows that one's education has begun. To accuse neither oneself nor others shows that one's education is complete. Epictetus


+ 355 Ignorance of all things is an evil neither terrible nor excessive, nor yet the greatest of all; but great cleverness and much learning, if they be accompanied by a bad training, are a much greater misfortune. Plato


+ 370 If all misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be contented to take their own and depart. Socrates


+ 385 Friendship is but another name for an alliance with the follies and the misfortunes of others. Our own share of miseries is sufficient: why enter then as volunteers into those of another? Thomas Jefferson


+ 439 The world is agreed that labor is the source from which human wants are mainly supplied. There is no dispute upon this point. From this point, however, men immediately diverge. Much disputation is maintained as to the best way of applying and controlling the labor element. By some it is assumed that labor is available only in connection with capital -- that nobody labors, unless somebody else, owning capital, somehow, by the use of that capital, induces him to do it. Having assumed this, they proceed to consider whether it is best that capital shall hire laborers, and thus induce them to work by their own consent; or buy them, and drive them to it without their consent. Having proceeded so far they naturally conclude that all laborers are necessarily either hired laborers, or slaves. They further assume that whoever is once a hired laborer, is fatally fixed in that condition for life; and thence again that his condition is as bad as, or worse than that of a slave. This is the "mud-sill" theory. ... By the "mud-sill" theory it is assumed that labor and education are incompatible; and any practical combination of them impossible. According to that theory, a blind horse upon a tread-mill, is a perfect illustration of what a laborer should be -- all the better for being blind, that he could not tread out of place, or kick understandingly. According to that theory, the education of laborers, is not only useless, but pernicious, and dangerous. In fact, it is, in some sort, deemed a misfortune that laborers should have heads at all. Abraham Lincoln


+ 252 Indeed, history is nothing more than a tableau of crimes and misfortunes. Voltaire


+ 235 All of us have sufficient fortitude to bear the misfortunes of others. Francois de La Rochefoucauld


+ 253 We all have strength enough to endure the misfortunes of others. Francois de La Rochefoucauld


+ 273 We exaggerate misfortune and happiness alike. We are never as bad off or as happy as we say we are. Honore de Balzac


+ 258 Nothing is so wretched or foolish as to anticipate misfortunes. What madness is it to be expecting evil before it comes. Lucius Annaeus Seneca


+ 226 The most hateful human misfortune is for a wise man to have no influence. Herodotus


+ 204 But Joseph's brother, Benjamin, Jacob did not send with his brothers, because, he said, Lest misfortune befall him. Bereshit 42:4


+ 194 But he Jacob said, My son shall not go down with you, because his brother is dead, and he alone is left, and if misfortune befalls him on the way you are going, you will bring down my gray head in sorrow to the grave. Bereshit 42:38


+ 179 Now if you take this one too away from me, and misfortune befalls him, you will bring down my hoary head in misery to the grave.' Bereshit 44:29


+ 128 If this is the way You treat me, please kill me if I have found favor in Your eyes, so that I not see my misfortune. Bamidbar 11:15


+ 112 Thatís how stories happen ó with a turning point, an unexpected twist. Thereís only one kind of happiness, but misfortune comes in all shapes and sizes. Itís like Tolstoy said. Happiness is an allegory, unhappiness a story. Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore