regarded

+ 340 Every man of action has a strong dose of egoism, pride, hardness, and cunning. But all those things will be regarded as high qualities if he can make them the means to achieve great ends. Giorgos Seferis


+ 335 Has a philosopher like you failed to discover that our country is more to be valued and higher and holier far than mother or father or any ancestor, and more to be regarded in the eyes of the gods and of men of understanding? Socrates


+ 297 Over grown military establishments are under any form of government inauspicious to liberty, and are to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty. George Washington


+ 307 The dangers of a concentration of all power in the general government of a confederacy so vast as ours are too obvious to be disregarded. Franklin Pierce


+ 458 When men take it in their heads to-day, to hang gamblers, or burn murderers, they should recollect, that, in the confusion usually attending such transactions, they will be as likely to hang or burn some one who is neither a gambler nor a murderer as one who is; and that, acting upon the example they set, the mob of to-morrow, may, and probably will, hang or burn some of them by the very same mistake. And not only so; the innocent, those who have ever set their faces against violations of law in every shape, alike with the guilty, fall victims to the ravages of mob law; and thus it goes on, step by step, till all the walls erected for the defense of the persons and property of individuals, are trodden down, and disregarded. Abraham Lincoln


+ 392 But all this even, is not the full extent of the evil. By such examples, by instances of the perpetrators of such acts going unpunished, the lawless in spirit, are encouraged to become lawless in practice; and having been used to no restraint, but dread of punishment, they thus become, absolutely unrestrained. Having ever regarded Government as their deadliest bane, they make a jubilee of the suspension of its operations; and pray for nothing so much, as its total annihilation. While, on the other hand, good men, men who love tranquillity, who desire to abide by the laws and enjoy their benefits, who would gladly spill their blood in the defense of their country, seeing their property destroyed, their families insulted, and their lives endangered, their persons injured, and seeing nothing in prospect that forebodes a change for the better, become tired of and disgusted with a government that offers them no protection, and are not much averse to a change in which they imagine they have nothing to lose. Thus, then, by the operation of this mobocratic spirit which all must admit is now abroad in the land, the strongest bulwark of any government, and particularly of those constituted like ours, may effectually be broken down and destroyedI mean the attachment of the people. Abraham Lincoln


+ 495 When Southern people tell us they are no more responsible for the origin of slavery than we are, I acknowledge the fact. When it is said that the institution exists, and that it is very difficult to get rid of it in any satisfactory way, I can understand and appreciate the saying. I surely will not blame them for not doing what I should not know how to do myself. If all earthly power were given me, I should not know what to do as to the existing institution. My first impulse would be to free all the slaves, and send them to Liberia, to their own native land. But a moment's reflection would convince me that whatever of high hope (as I think there is) there may be in this in the long run, its sudden execution is impossible. If they were all landed there in a day, they would all perish in the next ten days; and there are not surplus shipping and surplus money enough to carry them there in many times ten days. What then? Free them all, and keep them among us as underlings? Is it quite certain that this betters their condition? I think I would not hold one in slavery at any rate, yet the point is not clear enough for me to denounce people upon. What next? Free them, and make them politically and socially our equals. My own feelings will not admit of this, and if mine would, we well know that those of the great mass of whites will not. Whether this feeling accords with justice and sound judgment is not the sole question, if indeed it is any part of it. A universal feeling, whether well or ill founded, cannot be safely disregarded. We cannot then make them equals. It does seem to me that systems of gradual emancipation might be adopted, but for their tardiness in this I will not undertake to judge our brethren of the South. Abraham Lincoln


+ 417 The only assurance that I can now give of the future is reference to the past. The course which I have taken in the past in connection with this rebellion must be regarded as a guaranty of the future. My past public life, which has been long and laborious, has been founded, as I in good conscience believe, upon a great principle of right, which lies at the basis of all things. The best energies of my life have been spent in endeavoring to establish and perpetuate the principles of free government, and I believe that the Government in passing through its present perils will settle down upon principles consonant with popular rights more permanent and enduring than heretofore. I must be permitted to say, if I understand the feelings of my own heart, that I have long labored to ameliorate and elevate the condition of the great mass of the American people. Toil and an honest advocacy of the great principles of free government have been my lot. Duties have been mine; consequences are God's. This has been the foundation of my political creed, and I feel that in the end the Government will triumph and that these great principles will be permanently established. Andrew Johnson


+ 350 The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man's image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another. Albert Einstein


+ 347 There is a thing inherent and natural, which existed before heaven and earth. Motionless and fathomless, It stands alone and never changes; It pervades everywhere and never becomes exhausted. It may be regarded as the Mother of the Universe. I do not know its name. If I am forced to give it a name, I call it Tao, and I name it as supreme. Laozi


+ 273 In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move. Douglas Adams


+ 264 Everything we call real is made of things that cannot be regarded as real. Niels Bohr


+ 331 The Jews had a love-hate relationship with the Greek culture. They craved its civilization but resented its dominance. Josephus says they regarded Greeks as feckless, promiscuous, modernizing lightweights, yet many Jerusalemites were already living the fashionable lifestyle using Greek and Jewish names to show they could be both. Jewish conservatives disagreed; for them, the Greeks were simply idolaters. Simon Sebag Montefiore, Jerusalem: The Biography


+ 266 Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful. Lucius Annaeus Seneca


+ 140 He regarded marriage as an arbitrary and essentially adversarial relationship, akin to the yoking of prisoners on the chain gang. T.C. Boyle, If the River Was Whiskey


+ 89 Gods Law on mount Sinai. God's Law on mount Sinai Mankind on Earth is of the opinion that the word impossible applies to a lot of things. We hold a different opinion, because the things we regard utopia to day, may be possible tomorrow. There are therefore practically no utopias. If one had told people 4,000 years ago about all the things you have today, one would have regarded all of this without exception as impossible. Utopias have become reality. Todays generations fantasies are certainly realisable. This is why we absolutely cannot understand why one doubts our existence. Why cant one comprehend that we travel beyond the speed of light? Why does one doubt the possibility that dematerialisation exists? There is no utopia. Everything is possible, if one knows the way to realise it. It isnt for instance utopia that we, respectively our forefathers, brought the LAW of HEAVEN down to Earth. The handing over of the LAW of HEAVEN took place on Mount Sinai. I have indicated details about this once before in the past. If the handing over of this important event didnt take place conspicuously enough, then it is mainly due to the technological ignorance of the people at that time. What could they have known about spaceships travelling through space? As far as Moses was concerned, the spaceship was GODS ABODE and the rest of the crew HIS ANGELS. The siren was the divine trombone and the ships antigravity was GODS promise to put anyone to death that crossed a certain line. All of this is so simple and so easy to understand if one is willing to use ones mind. You have enough technical experience to correctly comprehend the LEGISLATION received on Mount Sinai. There is absolutely no room for doubt here, because any doubt would indicate mental derangement. He, who doesnt comprehend this plausible LEGISLATION, also does not know how a car is steered and unaware of the energy that moves it. There is however also an evil will that prevents comprehension. Generally speaking, these people are not dumb; there are even some very famous authorities in politics and the sciences amongst them as well as people in the field of theology. This evil will is like a blinker for spiritual eyes. People do not want to know the TRUTH, because it perturbs them personally. Atheists doubt GODS COMMANDMENTS. They deem it impossible that GOD talked to a human being on Mount Sinai amidst thunder and lightning. God's Law on mount SinaiThe Israelites saw a fiery cloud moving in front of them. This pillar of fire hovered horizontally. This pillar of fire did not hover vertically as Jewish theology assumes. There is no mentioning of a vertical pillar anywhere. This pillar was one of our spaceships, that is to say, a mother-ship. Their aura of light can still be observed on all our flying objects by you. The material of the spaceships under our control consists of a glass-like mass that is harder than your normal glass. The colour is similar to a Nile-green. The bible describes its appearance as being similar to chrysolite. Antigravity is so powerful that the landing must take place on solid rock. Our spaceships of this size land on Mount Etna or similar mountain these days. So as not to suffer any injuries, the Israelites were advised to stay beyond a boundary, crossing this boundary could be life threatening. A siren of great sound intensity warned the people from crossing the indicated boundary. Moses could only cross this boundary after the gravitational force was switched off. He received an appropriate signal. There was neither thunder nor lightning, only the din of the spaceship and its alternating aura of light. When the antigravity field was switched on, the Israelites fled in all directions filled with fear and terror. Ashtar