admit

+ 397 Pride is a sin that can readily be seen in others but is rarely admitted in ourselves. Ezra Taft Benson


+ 302 You can't embarrass Joss Whedon, he's got no pride! He fully admits it. 'Oh, it's me. I'm little and goofy.' You can't wound his pride. He's too self-deprecating. Nathan Fillion


+ 327 Mistakes are always forgivable, if one has the courage to admit them. Bruce Lee


+ 425 Now the compound or composite may be supposed to be naturally capable of being dissolved in like manner as being compounded; but that which is uncompounded, and that only, must be, if anything is, indissoluble. ...And the uncompounded may be assumed to be the same and unchanging, where the compound is always changing and never the same? ...Is that idea or essence, which in the dialectical process we define as essence of true existence--whether essence of equality, beauty, or anything else: are these essences, I say, liable at times to some degree of change? or are they each of them always what they are, having the same simple, self-existent and unchanging forms, and not admitting of variation at all, or in any way, or at any time?


+ 374 Let us... be careful of admitting into our souls the notion that there is no truth or health or soundness in any arguments at all; but let us rather say that there is as yet no health in us, and that we must quit ourselves like men and do our best to gain health--you and all other men with a view to the whole of your future life, and I myself with a view to death.


+ 471 I thought that as I had failed in the contemplation of true existence, I ought to be careful that I did not lose the eye of my soul; as people may injure their bodily eye by observing and gazing on the sun during an eclipse, unless they take the precaution of looking at the image reflected in the water, or in some similar medium. ...I was afraid that my soul might be blinded altogether if I looked at things with my eyes or tried by the help of my senses to apprehend them. And I thought that I had better had recourse to ideas, and seek in them truth in existence. I dare to say that the simile is not perfect--for I am far from admitting that he who contemplates existence through the medium of ideas, sees them only "through a glass darkly," any more than he who sees them in their working and effects.


+ 468 The Platonic Socrates was a pattern to subsequent philosophers for many ages... His merits are obvious. He is indifferent to worldly success, so devoid of fear that he remains calm and urbane and humorous to the last moment, caring more for what he believes to be the truth than for anything else whatever. He has, however, some very grave defects. He is dishonest and sophistical in argument, and in his private thinking he uses intellect to prove conclusions that are to him agreeable, rather than in a disinterested search for knowledge. There is something smug and unctuous about him, which reminds one of a bad type of cleric. His courage in the face of death would have been more remarkable if he had not believed that he was going to enjoy eternal bliss in the company of the gods. Unlike some of his predecessors, he was not scientific in his thinking, but was determined to prove the universe agreeable to his ethical standards. This is treachery to truth, and the worst of philosophic sins. As a man, we may believe him admitted to the communion of saints; but as a philosopher he needs a long residence in a scientific purgatory.


+ 322 I never will, by any word or act, bow to the shrine of intolerance or admit a right of inquiry into the religious opinions of others. Thomas Jefferson


+ 324 I believe that involuntary servitude, as it exists in different States of this Confederacy, is recognized by the Constitution. I believe that it stands like any other admitted right, and that the States where it exists are entitled to efficient remedies to enforce the constitutional provisions. Franklin Pierce


+ 450 I hope I am over wary; but if I am not, there is, even now, something of ill-omen, amongst us. I mean the increasing disregard for law which pervades the country; the growing disposition to substitute the wild and furious passions, in lieu of the sober judgment of Courts; and the worse than savage mobs, for the executive ministers of justice. This disposition is awfully fearful in any and that it now exists in ours, though grating to our feelings to admit, it would be a violation of truth and an insult to our intelligence to deny. Abraham Lincoln


+ 393 But all this even, is not the full extent of the evil. By such examples, by instances of the perpetrators of such acts going unpunished, the lawless in spirit, are encouraged to become lawless in practice; and having been used to no restraint, but dread of punishment, they thus become, absolutely unrestrained. Having ever regarded Government as their deadliest bane, they make a jubilee of the suspension of its operations; and pray for nothing so much, as its total annihilation. While, on the other hand, good men, men who love tranquillity, who desire to abide by the laws and enjoy their benefits, who would gladly spill their blood in the defense of their country, seeing their property destroyed, their families insulted, and their lives endangered, their persons injured, and seeing nothing in prospect that forebodes a change for the better, become tired of and disgusted with a government that offers them no protection, and are not much averse to a change in which they imagine they have nothing to lose. Thus, then, by the operation of this mobocratic spirit which all must admit is now abroad in the land, the strongest bulwark of any government, and particularly of those constituted like ours, may effectually be broken down and destroyedI mean the attachment of the people. Abraham Lincoln


+ 495 When Southern people tell us they are no more responsible for the origin of slavery than we are, I acknowledge the fact. When it is said that the institution exists, and that it is very difficult to get rid of it in any satisfactory way, I can understand and appreciate the saying. I surely will not blame them for not doing what I should not know how to do myself. If all earthly power were given me, I should not know what to do as to the existing institution. My first impulse would be to free all the slaves, and send them to Liberia, to their own native land. But a moment's reflection would convince me that whatever of high hope (as I think there is) there may be in this in the long run, its sudden execution is impossible. If they were all landed there in a day, they would all perish in the next ten days; and there are not surplus shipping and surplus money enough to carry them there in many times ten days. What then? Free them all, and keep them among us as underlings? Is it quite certain that this betters their condition? I think I would not hold one in slavery at any rate, yet the point is not clear enough for me to denounce people upon. What next? Free them, and make them politically and socially our equals. My own feelings will not admit of this, and if mine would, we well know that those of the great mass of whites will not. Whether this feeling accords with justice and sound judgment is not the sole question, if indeed it is any part of it. A universal feeling, whether well or ill founded, cannot be safely disregarded. We cannot then make them equals. It does seem to me that systems of gradual emancipation might be adopted, but for their tardiness in this I will not undertake to judge our brethren of the South. Abraham Lincoln


+ 436 The country needs and, unless I mistake its temper, the country demands bold, persistent experimentation. It is common sense to take a method and try it: If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something. The millions who are in want will not stand by silently forever while the things to satisfy their needs are within easy reach. We need enthusiasm, imagination and the ability to face facts, even unpleasant ones, bravely. We need to correct, by drastic means if necessary, the faults in our economic system from which we now suffer. We need the courage of the young. Yours is not the task of making your way in the world, but the task of remaking the world which you will find before you. May every one of us be granted the courage, the faith and the vision to give the best that is in us to that remaking! Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 285 It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 265 Take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly, and try another. But by all means, try something. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 441 You may not be her first, her last, or her only. She loved before she may love again. But if she loves you now, what else matters? She's not perfectyou aren't either, and the two of you may never be perfect together but if she can make you laugh, cause you to think twice, and admit to being human and making mistakes, hold onto her and give her the most you can. She may not be thinking about you every second of the day, but she will give you a part of her that she knows you can breakher heart. So don't hurt her, don't change her, don't analyze and don't expect more than she can give. Smile when she makes you happy, let her know when she makes you mad, and miss her when she's not there. Bob Marley


+ 366 Win People to Your Way of Thinking
10. The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.
11. Show respect for the other persons opinion. Never say, Youre wrong.
12. If you are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically.
13. Begin in a friendly way.
14. Get the other person saying yes, yes immediately.
15. Let the other person do a great deal of the talking.
16. Let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers.
17. Try honestly to see things from the other persons point of view.
18. Be sympathetic with the other persons ideas and desires.
19. Appeal to the nobler motives.
20. Dramatize your ideas.
21. Throw down a challenge.
Dale Carnegie


+ 253 No persons are more frequently wrong, than those who will not admit they are wrong. Francois De La Rochefoucauld


+ 275 Happy people know and understand that they are 100% responsible for their life. They take responsibility for their moods, attitude, thoughts, feelings, actions and words. They are the first to admit when they've made a mistake.


+ 291 A fundamental conclusion of the new physics also acknowledges that the observer creates the reality. As observers, we are personally involved with the creation of our own reality. Physicists are being forced to admit that the universe is a mental construction. Pioneering physicist Sir James Jeans wrote: The stream of knowledge is heading toward a non-mechanical reality; the universe begins to look more like a great thought than like a great machine. Mind no longer appears to be an accidental intruder into the realm of matter, we ought rather hail it as the creator and governor of the realm of matter. Get over it, and accept the inarguable conclusion. The universe is immaterial-mental and spiritual. (R.C. Henry, The Mental Universe ; Nature 436:29,2005)


+ 263 Yehuda had the quality of kingship. Why? He admitted the source of his greatness Gratitude.


+ 243 The courts must carry out the laws of the plaintiff, admitter, or denier Ex. 22:8


+ 328 Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly, and get on with improving your other innovations. Take the iPhone. We had a different enclosure design for this iPhone until way too close to the introduction to ever change it. And I came in one Monday morning, I said, I just don't love this. I can't convince myself to fall in love with this. And this is the most important product we've ever done.' And we pushed the reset button. Steve Jobs Fortune, 2008


+ 359 When we speak of man, we have a conception of humanity as a whole, and before applying scientific methods to the investigation of his movement we must accept this as a physical fact. But can anyone doubt to-day that all the millions of individuals and all the innumerable types and characters constitute an entity, a unit? Though free to think and act, we are held together, like the stars in the firmament, with ties inseparable. These ties cannot be seen, but we can feel them. I cut myself in the finger, and it pains me: this finger is a part of me. I see a friend hurt, and it hurts me, too: my friend and I are one. And now I see stricken down an enemy, a lump of matter which, of all the lumps of matter in the universe, I care least for, and it still grieves me. Does this not prove that each of us is only part of a whole? For ages this idea has been proclaimed in the consummately wise teachings of religion, probably not alone as a means of insuring peace and harmony among men, but as a deeply founded truth. The Buddhist expresses it in one way, the Christian in another, but both say the same: We are all one. Metaphysical proofs are, however, not the only ones which we are able to bring forth in support of this idea. Science, too, recognizes this connectedness of separate individuals, though not quite in the same sense as it admits that the suns, planets, and moons of a constellation are one body, and there can be no doubt that it will be experimentally confirmed in times to come, when our means and methods for investigating psychical and other states and phenomena shall have been brought to great perfection. Still more: this one human being lives on and on. The individual is ephemeral, races and nations come and pass away, but man remains. Therein lies the profound difference between the individual and the whole. Nikola Tesla


+ 306 Mutual understanding would be immensely facilitated by the use of one universal tongue. But which shall it be, is the great question. At present it looks as if the English might be adopted as such, though it must be admitted that it is not the most suitable. Each language, of course, excels in some feature.... A practical answer to that momentous question must perforce be found in times to come, for it is manifest that by adopting one common language the onward march of man would be prodigiously quickened. I do not believe that an artificial concoction, like Volapuk, will ever find universal acceptance, however time-saving it might be. That would be contrary to human nature. Languages have grown into our hearts. Nikola Tesla


+ 397 Tesla, with his almost preternatural insight into alternating current phenomenon that had enabled him some years before to revolutionize the art of electric power transmission through the invention of the rotary field motor, knew how to make resonance serve, not merely the role of a microscope to make visible the electric oscillations, as Hertz had done, but he made it serve the role of a stereopticon to render spectacular to large audiences the phenomena of electric oscillations and high frequency currents....He did more to excite interest and create an intelligent understanding of these phenomena in the years 18911893 than anyone else, and the more we learn about high frequency phenomena, resonance, and radiation today, the nearer we find ourselves approaching what we at one time were inclined, through a species of intellectual myopia, to regard as the fascinating but fantastical speculations of a man whom we are now compelled, in the light of modern experience and knowledge, to admit was a prophet. But Tesla was no mere lecturer and prophet. He saw to the fulfillment of his prophesies and it has been difficult to make any but unimportant improvements in the art of radio-telegraphy without traveling part of the way at least, along a trail blazed by this pioneer who, though eminently ingenious, practical, and successful in the apparatus he devised and constructed, was so far ahead of his time that the best of us then mistook him for a dreamer. I never came anywhere near having an appreciation of what Mr. Tesla had done in this art until a very late date... John Stone Stone


+ 242 What we at one time were inclined, through a species of intellectual myopia, to regard as the fascinating but fantastical speculations of a man whom we are now compelled, in the light of modern experience and knowledge, to admit was a prophet. J. S. Stone


+ 192 It is a mistake to consider man and woman two separate beings. They are no more than two halves of a single form, two converse hemispheres that fit tightly together to make a perfect whole. They are heaven and earth encapsulated in flesh and blood. It is only that on its way to enter this world, this sphere was shattered apart. What was once the infinity of a perfect globe became two finite surfaces. What was once a duet of sublime harmony became two bizarre solos of unfinished motions, of unresolved discord. So much so, that each one hears in itself only half a melody, and so too it hears in the other. Each sees the other and says, That is broken. Feigning wholeness, the two halves wander aimlessly in space alone. Until each fragment allows itself to surrender, to admit that it too is broken. Only then can it search for the warmth it is missing. For the depth of its own self that was ripped away. For the harmony that will make sense of its song. And in perfect union, two finite beings find in one another infinite beauty. Rabbi Tzvi Freeman


+ 68 How one can achieve complete equivalence of form, so all ones actions are to give to others, while mans very essence is only to receive for oneself? By nature, we are unable to do even the smallest thing to benefit others... Indeed, I admit that this is a very difficult thing. One cannot change the nature of ones own creation, which is only to receive for oneself, much less invert ones nature from one extreme to the other, meaning to not receive anything for oneself, but rather act only to bestow. Yet, this is why the Creator gave us Torah and Mitzvot, which we were commanded to do only in order to bestow contentment upon the Creator. Had it not been for the engagement in Torah and Mitzvot Lishma (for Her Name), to bring contentment to the Creator with them, and not to benefit ourselves, there would have been no tactic in the world that could help us invert our nature. Baal HaSulam, A Speech for the Completion of The Zohar


+ 86 A religion that absolves a person from responsibility in front of a higher JUDGE after that persons demise is a last straw that everybody is willing to grasp. But such a religion is only a piece of straw and not a life belt. What we offer mankind is a life belt it can depend upon. We know that our friends on this Earth work their fingers to the bone to disseminate the TRUTH. We cannot offer you any financial support. We can only offer you the TRUTH. Everything else is left up to progress. We presently still trust this progress. Communistic atheism will also have to abdicate, because the TRUTH will not allow itself to be held up. We are only surprised that the churches are so narrow minded that they do not recognise the TRUTH. It is their duty to primarily work on behalf of the TRUTH. This is their assignment, their sacred MISSION, the way it is also our MISSION. If the people on Earth would really believe in GOD, things on this Terra would be completely different. This planet is however enveloped by the darkness of ignorance. This is why there is murder and mayhem. Our problem consists in trying to demonstrate to you that this faithlessness is a mistake. This is not an easy assignment, because the most august TRUTH can be twisted and devitalised through malevolence. Religious communities are not exempt from this. The fanatic and dogmatic doggedly sticks to his points of view and woe to him that dares to question this. A lot will have been achieved once the LEGISLATION received on Mount Sinai has been verified; a lot of things will inevitably have to change. The people on Earth only obey orders when they fear something and this is why the divine LAW must be feared. The LAW of the LORD however doesnt just apply during ones terrestrial existence on the contrary, is also has an effect after ones life on Earth. The MESSENGER CHRIST solemnly indicated that this was so. GODS LAW does not only concern mans behaviourism according to GODS wishes, HIS LAWS are more than terrestrial laws; they are a part of the laws of nature. He who acts against the laws of nature will face the potency of the consequences. As I am already talking about atheism, I might as well emphasise that theistic religion also contains a fair portion of atheism, because all the pious fuss within it is part of it. The leading stratums of society are of the opinion that death extinguishes mans consciousness forever. These people hold onto this thesis with an iron grip. They indignantly, well actually arrogantly, reject any other explanation. It therefore comes as no surprise that this terrible aberration impacts on all their decisions. One leading politician made a name for himself by admitting openly that he regards GOD to be a superstitious fantasy. We place the greatest importance in the conclusion that a GOD exists. We also place importance in the fact that every human being throughout the universe possesses an imperishable existence, one that runs through many different phases. Amongst them is a conscious phases of a spiritual existence wherein one has to give account for all ones thoughts and actions. The churches established a series of dogmas that do not help mankind; they rather lead towards an abyss. One of these dogmas refers to a Day of Judgement and Resurrection. One does not have to spend a lot of time discussing the Resurrection of the human soul with its consciousness at all; it is as certain as physical death. The Day of Judgement however plays an important part, because: The so-called Day of Judgement is the last day of ones terrestrial, physical existence. Ashtar