hag

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+ 338 You'll find that no pride is greater than the pride that comes with being thick. Britain is filled with people who are really proud of their stupidity. Andrew O'Hagan


+ 412 The records in the house I really remember were, well, Glen Campbell's 'Wichita Lineman' and 'Galveston.' Even as a kid, I knew these songs were glorious. My dad also had records by Merle Haggard, Charley Pride, Waylon Jennings, and then there was also the Eagles and Don Henley. Anything Texas, which includes Don Henley, was big. Keith Urban


+ 405 Only love interests me, and I am only in contact with things that revolve around love. Marc Chagall


+ 471 The reciprocal relationship of epistemology and science is of noteworthy kind. They are dependent on each other. Epistemology without contact with science becomes an empty scheme. Science without epistemology is — insofar as it is thinkable at all — primitive and muddled. However, no sooner has the epistemologist, who is seeking a clear system, fought his way through to such a system, than he is inclined to interpret the thought-content of science in the sense of his system and to reject whatever does not fit into his system. The scientist, however, cannot afford to carry his striving for epistemological systematic that far. He accepts gratefully the epistemological conceptual analysis; but the external conditions, which are set for him by the facts of experience, do not permit him to let himself be too much restricted in the construction of his conceptual world by the adherence to an epistemological system. He therefore must appear to the systematic epistemologist as a type of unscrupulous opportunist: he appears as realist insofar as he seeks to describe a world independent of the acts of perception; as idealist insofar as he looks upon the concepts and theories as free inventions of the human spirit (not logically derivable from what is empirically given); as positivist insofar as he considers his concepts and theories justified only to the extent to which they furnish a logical representation of relations among sensory experiences. He may even appear as Platonist or Pythagorean insofar as he considers the viewpoint of logical simplicity as an indispensible and effective tool of his research. Albert Einstein


+ 334 I won't close down a business of subnormal profitability merely to add a fraction of a point to our corporate returns. I also feel it inappropriate for even an exceptionally profitable company to fund an operation once it appears to have unending losses in prospect. Adam Smith would disagree with my first proposition and Karl Marx would disagree with my second; the middle ground is the only position that leaves me comfortable. Warren Buffett, The Warren Buffett Way by Robert Hagstrom+


+ 214 God has given us everything we need,
right now, in this moment,
to do what we were meant to do.
Rae Shagalov


+ 258 When we choose trust, joy, faith, life,
When we appreciate what we have,
When we learn Torah and bring it into our lives.
We bring Godliness into the world.
It is our privilege to bring Godliness into this world.
Rae Shagalov


+ 247 Godliness shines openly in the Mishneh.
When a Tzaddik learns the Mishneh
he sees God face to face.
In the Germarrah the Godliness is more concealed.
Rae Ekman Shagalov


+ 229 Working in desperation is going too far. God wants us to take reasonable steps and do what we have to. Rae Ekman Shagalov


+ 308 We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another. Robert Oppenheimer


+ 344 Said Rabbi Yossei the son of Kisma: Once, I was traveling and I encountered a man. He greeted me and I returned his greetings. Said he to me: "Rabbi, where are you from?" Said I to him: "From a great city of sages and scholars, am I." Said he to me: "Rabbi, would you like to dwell with us in our place? I will give you a million dinars of gold, precious stones and pearls." Said I to him: "If you were to give me all the silver, gold, precious stones and pearls in the world, I would not dwell anywhere but in a place of Torah. Indeed, so is written in the book of psalms by David the king of Israel: `I prefer the Torah of Your mouth over thousands in gold and silver' (Psalms 118:72). Furthermore, when a person passes from this world neither silver, nor gold, nor precious stones, nor pearls accompany him, only Torah and good deeds, as is stated (Proverbs 6:22): `When you go it will direct you, when you lie down it will watch over you, and when you awaken it shall be your speech.' `When you go it will direct you' - in this world; `when you lie down it will watch over you' - in the grave; `and when you awaken it shall be our speech' - in the World To Come. Also it says (Chaggai 2:8): `Mine is the silver and Mine is the gold, so says the L-rd of Hosts.' " Pirkei Avot 6:9


+ 255 I definitely believe in plastic surgery. I don't want to be an old hag. There's no fun in that. Scarlett Johansson


+ 167 Now Sarai, Abram's wife, had not borne to him, and she had an Egyptian handmaid named Hagar. Bereshit 16:1


+ 183 So Sarai, Abram's wife, took Hagar the Egyptian, her handmaid, at the end of ten years of Abram's dwelling in the land of Canaan, and she gave her to Abram her husband for a wife. Bereshit 16:3


+ 178 And he came to Hagar, and she conceived, and she saw that she was pregnant, and her mistress became unimportant in her eyes. Bereshit 16:4


+ 189 And he said, Hagar, Sarai's servant, where are you coming from, and where are you going to? And she said, From before Sarai my mistress, I am fleeing. Bereshit 16:8


+ 173 And Hagar bore a son to Abram, and Abram named his son, whom Hagar had borne, Ishmael. Bereshit 16:15


+ 173 And Abram was eighty-six years old, when Hagar bore Ishmael to Abram. Bereshit 16:16


+ 193 And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, whom she had borne to Abraham, making merry. Bereshit 21:9


+ 210 And Abraham arose early in the morning, and he took bread and a leather pouch of water, and he gave them to Hagar, he placed them on her shoulder, and the child, and he sent her away; and she went and wandered in the desert of Beer sheba. Bereshit 21:14


+ 202 And God heard the lad's voice, and an angel of God called to Hagar from heaven, and said to her, What is troubling you, Hagar? Fear not, for God has heard the lad's voice in the place where he is. Bereshit 21:17


+ 192 Now these are the generations of Ishmael the son of Abraham, whom Hagar the Egyptian, the maidservant of Sarah, bore to Abraham. Bereshit 25:12


+ 144 And the sons of Gad were Ziphion, Haggi, Shuni, and Ezbon, Eri, Arodi, and Areli. Bereshit 46:16


+ 99 The descendants of Gad according to their families: the family of the Zefonites from Zefon, the family of the Haggites from Haggi, the family of the Shunites from Shuni, Bamidbar 26:15


+ 69 They journeyed from Benei jaakan and camped in Hor hagidgad. Bamidbar 33:32


+ 69 They journeyed from Hor hagidgad and camped in Jotbathah. Bamidbar 33:33


+ 128 “What are the dead, anyway, but waves and energy? Light shining from a dead star? That, by the way, is a phrase of Julian's. I remember it from a lecture of his on the Iliad, when Patroklos appears to Achilles in a dream. There is a very moving passage where Achilles overjoyed at the sight of the apparition – tries to throw his arms around the ghost of his old friend, and it vanishes. The dead appear to us in dreams, said Julian, because that's the only way they can make us see them; what we see is only a projection, beamed from a great distance, light shining at us from a dead star… Which reminds me, by the way, of a dream I had a couple of weeks ago. I found myself in a strange deserted city – an old city, like London – underpopulated by war or disease. It was night; the streets were dark, bombed-out, abandoned. For a long time, I wandered aimlessly – past ruined parks, blasted statuary, vacant lots overgrown with weeds and collapsed apartment houses with rusted girders poking out of their sides like ribs. But here and there, interspersed among the desolate shells of the heavy old public buildings, I began to see new buildings, too, which were connected by futuristic walkways lit from beneath. Long, cool perspectives of modern architecture, rising phosphorescent and eerie from the rubble. I went inside one of these new buildings. It was like a laboratory, maybe, or a museum. My footsteps echoed on the tile floors.There was a cluster of men, all smoking pipes, gathered around an exhibit in a glass case that gleamed in the dim light and lit their faces ghoulishly from below. I drew nearer. In the case was a machine revolving slowly on a turntable, a machine with metal parts that slid in and out and collapsed in upon themselves to form new images. An Inca temple… click click click… the Pyramids… the Parthenon. History passing beneath my very eyes, changing every moment. 'I thought I'd find you here,' said a voice at my elbow. It was Henry. His gaze was steady and impassive in the dim light. Above his ear, beneath the wire stem of his spectacles, I could just make out the powder burn and the dark hole in his right temple. I was glad to see him, though not exactly surprised. 'You know,' I said to him, 'everybody is saying that you're dead.' He stared down at the machine. The Colosseum… click click click… the Pantheon. 'I'm not dead,' he said. 'I'm only having a bit of trouble with my passport.' 'What?' He cleared his throat. 'My movements are restricted,' he said. 'I no longer have the ability to travel as freely as I would like.' Hagia Sophia. St. Mark's, in Venice. 'What is this place?' I asked him. 'That information is classified, I'm afraid.' 1 looked around curiously. It seemed that I was the only visitor. 'Is it open to the public?' I said. 'Not generally, no.' I looked at him. There was so much I wanted to ask him, so much I wanted to say; but somehow I knew there wasn't time and even if there was, that it was all, somehow, beside the point. 'Are you happy here?' I said at last. He considered this for a moment. 'Not particularly,' he said. 'But you're not very happy where you are, either.' St. Basil's, in Moscow. Chartres. Salisbury and Amiens. He glanced at his watch. 'I hope you'll excuse me,' he said, 'but I'm late for an appointment.' He turned from me and walked away. I watched his back receding down the long, gleaming hall.” ? Donna Tartt, The Secret History


+ 97 He looked haggard and careworn, like a Borgia who has suddenly remembered that he has forgotten to shove cyanide in the consomm?, and the dinner-gong due any moment. P.G. Wodehouse, Carry on, Jeeves


+ 106 Most of the times, reason for unhappiness is desiring for the things which are far from fulfilling our expectations. Sriveena Dhagavkar


+ 107 Most of the times reason for unhappiness is, desiring for the things which are far from our expectations. Sriveena Dhagavkar


+ 110 Most of the time reason for unhappiness is, desiring for the things which are far from our expectations. Sriveena Dhagavkar


+ 134 Mathematics provides a compact and exact language used to describe of the order in nature. This was noted and advocated by Pythagoras, Plato, Galileo, and Newton.


+ 110 The study of space originates with geometry – in particular, Euclidean geometry, which combines space and numbers, and encompasses the well-known Pythagorean theorem.


+ 87 Autophagy is the natural, regulated, destructive mechanism of the cell that disassembles unnecessary or dysfunctional components


+ 55 Our sages said, “I have created the evil inclination, I have created the Torah as a spice” (Babba Batra, 16). The matter of the spice is as our sages said, “If only they left Me and kept My Torah, the Light would reform them” (Yerushalmi, Hagiga, 6b). Thus, that there is a power in the Torah to reform a person, referring to the evil within man, meaning to make the will to receive be in order to bestow. Rabash, The Rungs of the Ladder, “Man Is Created in the Torah”