faculties

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+ 297 The diversity in the faculties of men, from which the rights of property originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to an uniformity of interests. The protection of these faculties is the first object of government. James Madison


+ 319 Where an excess of power prevails, property of no sort is duly respected. No man is safe in his opinions, his person, his faculties, or his possessions. James Madison


+ 392 Certainly the Government of the United States is a limited government, and so is every State government a limited government. With us this idea of limitation spreads through every form of administration general, State, and municipal and rests on the great distinguishing principle of the recognition of the rights of man. The ancient republics absorbed the individual in the state prescribed his religion and controlled his activity. The American system rests on the assertion of the equal right of every man to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, to freedom of conscience, to the culture and exercise of all his faculties. As a consequence the State government is limited as to the General Government in the interest of union, as to the individual citizen in the interest of freedom. Andrew Johnson


+ 346 Perhaps the history of the errors of mankind, all things considered, is more valuable and interesting than that of their discoveries. Truth is uniform and narrow; it constantly exists, and does not seem to require so much an active energy, as a passive aptitude of the soul in order to encounter it. But error is endlessly diversified; it has no reality, but is the pure and simple creation of the mind that invents it. In this field the soul has room enough to expand herself, to display all her boundless faculties, and all her beautiful and interesting extravagancies and absurdities. Benjamin Franklin, from his report to the King of France on Animal Magnetism, 1784


+ 258 The finest emotion of which we are capable is the mystic spiritual evolution, spiritual, evolution, Spirituality, Albert Einstein, religion, spirit, quotes, Albert, Einsteinemotion. Herein lies the germ of all art and all true science. Anyone to whom this feeling is alien, who is no longer capable of wonderment and lives in a state of fear is a dead man. To know that what is impenatrable for us really exists and manifests itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, whose gross forms alone are intelligible to our poor faculties this knowledge, this feeling that is the core of the true religious sentiment. In this sense, and in this sense alone, I rank myself amoung profoundly religious men. Albert Einstein


+ 118 I have found that, in the composition of the human body as compared with the bodies of animals, the organs of sense are duller and coarser. Thus, it is composed of less ingenious instruments, and of spaces less capacious for receiving the faculties of sense. Leonardo da Vinci