dull

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+ 370 Nothing touches my heart more quickly than a tribute of honor to a great and noble character; but as I sat in my seat and witnessed this demonstration, this assemblage seemed to me a human ocean in tempest. I have seen the sea lashed into fury and tossed into spray, and its grandeur moves the soul of the dullest man; but I remember that it is not the billows, but the calm level of the sea, from which all heights and depths are measured. When the storm has passed and the hour of calm settles on the ocean, when the sunlight bathes its peaceful surface, then the astronomer and surveyor take the level from which they measure all terrestrial heights and depths. James A. Garfield


+ 362 Each moment of a happy lover's hour is worth an age of dull and common life. Aphra Behn


+ 320 The really valuable thing in the pageant of human life seems to me not the State but the creative, sentient individual, the personality; it alone creates the noble and the sublime, while the herd as such remains dull in thought and dull in feeling. Albert Einstein


+ 267 I think the first duty of all art, including fiction of any kind, is to entertain. That is to say, to hold interest. No matter how worthy the message of something, if it's dull, you're just not communicating. Poul Anderson


+ 278 Be anything you want to be, but don't be dull. Frank Robinson


+ 237 Greek philosophy seems to have met with something with which a good tragedy is not supposed to meet, namely, a dull ending. Karl Marx


+ 355 If statistics are right, the Jews constitute but one percent of the human race. It suggests a nebulous dim puff of stardust lost in the blaze of the Milky way. properly, the Jew ought hardly to be heard of, but he is heard of, has always been heard of. He is as prominent on the planet as any other people, and his commercial importance is extravagantly out of proportion to the smallness of his bulk. His contributions to the world’s list of great names in literature, science, art, music, finance, medicine, and abstruse learning are also away out of proportion to the weakness of his numbers. He has made a marvelous fight in this world, in all the ages; and had done it with his hands tied behind him. He could be vain of himself, and be excused for it. The Egyptian, the Babylonian, and the Persian rose, filled the planet with sound and splendor, then faded to dream-stuff and passed away; the Greek and the Roman followed; and made a vast noise, and they are gone; other people have sprung up and held their torch high for a time, but it burned out, and they sit in twilight now, or have vanished. The Jew saw them all, beat them all, and is now what he always was, exhibiting no decadence, no infirmities of age, no weakening of his parts, no slowing of his energies, no dulling of his alert and aggressive mind. All things are mortal but the Jew; all other forces pass, but he remains. What is the secret of his immortality? Mark Twain (“Concerning The Jews,” Harper’s Magazine, 1899 see The Complete Essays of Mark Twain, Doubleday [1963] pg. 249)


+ 290 “It is against their own insoluble problem of being human that the dull and base in humanity are in revolt in anti-Semitism. Judaism, nevertheless, together with Hellenism and Christianity is an inalienable component of our Christian Western civilization, the eternal “call to Sinai” against which humanity again and again rebels.” - Herman Rauschning, The Beast From the Abyss, pp. 155-56


+ 288 We have peace with Israel. We're actually the last man standing. So there is going to be immense pressure and people asking, 'Why are we having this relationship when it's not benefiting anybody?' Obviously, my answer is you always benefit from peace. King Abdullah II. King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan


+ 342 If the iron is dull, and he did not sharpen the edge, it still strengthens the armies, but wisdom has a greater advantage. Kohelet 10:10


+ 207 All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.


+ 304 I have a friend who's an artist and has sometimes taken a view which I don't agree with very well. He'll hold up a flower and say "look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. Then he says "I as an artist can see how beautiful this is but you as a scientist take this all apart and it becomes a dull thing," and I think that he's kind of nutty. First of all, the beauty that he sees is available to other people and to me too, I believe. Although I may not be quite as refined aesthetically as he is ... I can appreciate the beauty of a flower. At the same time, I see much more about the flower than he sees. I could imagine the cells in there, the complicated actions inside, which also have a beauty. I mean it's not just beauty at this dimension, at one centimeter; there's also beauty at smaller dimensions, the inner structure, also the processes. The fact that the colors in the flower evolved in order to attract insects to pollinate it is interesting; it means that insects can see the color. It adds a question: does this aesthetic sense also exist in the lower forms? Why is it aesthetic? All kinds of interesting questions which the science knowledge only adds to the excitement, the mystery and the awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. Richard P. Feynman


+ 169 Now it came about at that time that Judah was demoted by his brothers, and he turned away until he came to an Adullamite man, named Hirah. Bereshit 38:1


+ 184 Many days passed, and Shua's daughter, Judah's wife, died; and Judah was consoled, and he went up to watch over his sheepshearers he and Hirah, his Adullamite friend to Timnah. Bereshit 38:12


+ 166 And Judah sent the kid by the hand of his Adullamite friend to take the pledge from the woman's hand, but he did not find her. Bereshit 38:20


+ 116 I have found that, in the composition of the human body as compared with the bodies of animals, the organs of sense are duller and coarser. Thus, it is composed of less ingenious instruments, and of spaces less capacious for receiving the faculties of sense. Leonardo da Vinci


+ 159 At times we may grow distressed, hearing of some great quality that we ourselves do not possess. We may become as nothing in our eyes. Then depression starts to tarnish the luster of our soul. In the presence of that quality of greatness that we cannot attain, our spirituality grows dull. At such times, we must fortify ourselves not to envy another’s fortune. We must use our feeling of insignificance only to an appropriate degree: to overcome ego, so as not to grow proud. But we should be satisfied and joyful with our lot. We should cling ever more forcefully to our strong points. Then our light will break forth like the dawn, and our healed spirit will swiftly blossom. Rav Avraham Yitzchak Kook


+ 109 Positive Mindfulness

When we elevate matters with our clarity of intent, our awareness continuously expands in the abundance of a superior reality. At that point, our desire—a desire of eternal love, of great love—for the light of the infinite is scented from the Eden of life. Then we shall gaze and be illumined.

But if our mindfulness is dislodged and grows impoverished, the face of heaven darkens. Beauty turns to mourning and to barrenness. Then that clarifying process that comes from heaven, which demands the right to play its role, depresses the special mission of humanity. It dulls the light of mindfulness and the complete contents of a full life. This clarifying process, reaching to the root of all being, is a necessity: deeply implanted and flowing without cease. Now, the wellsprings of the flow of life dry up because our hands are feeble in dealing with the supernal Torah.

But everything returns to its light and to its shining life when we engage in supernal repentance filled with knowledge and positive mindfulness, illumined with the light of Torah contained within the wisdom of the Jewish people, which is the inheritance of our patriarchs and which is filled with an eternal glory.

The text of the blessing, “He planted eternal life within us,” refers to the oral Torah: in all its levels and in the totality of its beauty.

Orot Hatorah 3:2