bread

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+ 266 Most men are within a finger's breadth of being mad. Diogenes


+ 326 A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circlue of our felicities. Thomas Jefferson


+ 341 A wise and frugal government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. Thomas Jefferson


+ 486 There is a natural disgust in the minds of nearly all white people, to the idea of an indiscriminate amalgamation of the white and black races; and Judge Douglas evidently is basing his chief hope, upon the chances of being able to appropriate the benefit of this disgust to himself. If he can, by much drumming and repeating, fasten the odium of that idea upon his adversaries, he thinks he can struggle through the storm. He therefore clings to this hope, as a drowning man to the last plank. He makes an occasion for lugging it in from the opposition to the Dred Scott decision. He finds the Republicans insisting that the Declaration of Independence includes ALL men, black as well as white; and forth-with he boldly denies that it includes negroes at all, and proceeds to argue gravely that all who contend it does, do so only because they want to vote, and eat, and sleep, and marry with negroes! He will have it that they cannot be consistent else. Now I protest against that counterfeit logic which concludes that, because I do not want a black woman for a slave I must necessarily want her for a wife. I need not have her for either, I can just leave her alone. In some respects she certainly is not my equal; but in her natural right to eat the bread she earns with her own hands without asking leave of any one else, she is my equal, and the equal of all others. Abraham Lincoln


+ 437 That is the real issue. That is the issue that will continue in this country when these poor tongues of Judge Douglas and myself shall be silent. It is the eternal struggle between these two principles — right and wrong — throughout the world. They are the two principles that have stood face to face from the beginning of time; and will ever continue to struggle. The one is the common right of humanity, and the other the divine right of kings. It is the same principle in whatever shape it develops itself. It is the same spirit that says, "You toil and work and earn bread, and I'll eat it." No matter in what shape it comes, whether from the mouth of a king who seeks to bestride the people of his own nation and live by the fruit of their labor, or from one race of men as an apology for enslaving another race, it is the same tyrannical principle. Abraham Lincoln


+ 460 The old general rule was that educated people did not perform manual labor. They managed to eat their bread, leaving the toil of producing it to the uneducated. This was not an insupportable evil to the working bees, so long as the class of drones remained very small. But now, especially in these free States, nearly all are educated -- quite too nearly all, to leave the labor of the uneducated, in any wise adequate to the support of the whole. It follows from this that henceforth educated people must labor. Otherwise, education itself would become a positive and intolerable evil. No country can sustain, in idleness, more than a small percentage of its numbers. The great majority must labor at something productive. Abraham Lincoln


+ 312 There is an obvious connection, on the declining Roman empire's bread and circuses model, between political enthusiasm for public spectacles and the periods when we are least able to pay for them. Iain Sinclair


+ 329 The hunger for love is much more difficult to remove than the hunger for bread. Mother Teresa


+ 428 The efforts of most human-beings are consumed in the struggle for their daily bread, but most of those who are, either through fortune or some special gift, relieved of this struggle are largely absorbed in further improving their worldly lot. Beneath the effort directed toward the accumulation of worldly goods lies all too frequently the illusion that this is the most substantial and desirable end to be achieved; but there is, fortunately, a minority composed of those who recognize early in their lives that the most beautiful and satisfying experiences open to humankind are not derived from the outside, but are bound up with the development of the individual's own feeling, thinking and acting. The genuine artists, investigators and thinkers have always been persons of this kind. However inconspicuously the life of these individuals runs its course, none the less the fruits of their endeavors are the most valuable contributions which one generation can make to its successors. Albert Einstein


+ 262 It is not meet to take the children's bread, and to cast it to dogs.


+ 235 Not to eat bread from new grain before the Omer — Lev. 23:14


+ 230 Not to bake a meal offering as leavened bread — Lev. 6:10


+ 201 To make the show bread — Ex. 25:30


+ 355 Ten miracles were performed for our forefathers in the Holy Temple: No woman ever miscarried because of the smell of the holy meat. The holy meat never spoiled. Never was a fly seen in the slaughterhouse. Never did the High Priest have an accidental seminal discharge on Yom Kippur. The rains did not extinguish the wood-fire burning upon the altar. The wind did not prevail over the column of smoke [rising from the altar]. No disqualifying problem was ever discovered in the Omer offering, the Two Loaves or the Showbread. They stood crowded but had ample space in which to prostrate themselves. Never did a snake or scorpion cause injury in Jerusalem. And no man ever said to his fellow "My lodging in Jerusalem is too cramped for me." Pirkei Avot 5:5


+ 304 Such is the way of Torah: Bread with salt you shall eat, water in small measure you shall drink, and upon the ground you shall sleep; live a life of deprivation and toil in Torah. If so you do, "fortunate are you, and good is to you" (Psalms 128:2): fortunate are you in this world, and it is good to you in the World To Come. Pirkei Avot 6:4


+ 265 They feast on wickedness and cruelty as if they were eating bread and drinking wine. Mishlei 4:17


+ 265 A prostitute will treat you like a loaf of bread, and a woman who takes part in adultery may cost you your life. Mishlei 6:26


+ 231 Come, partake of my bread and drink of the wine I have mingled. Mishlei 9:5


+ 238 "Stolen water is sweet, and bread eaten in secret is pleasant." Mishlei 9:17


+ 228 It is better to eat a dry crust of bread in peace than to have a feast where there is quarreling. Mishlei 17:1


+ 233 It is not good for a judge to take sides, but some will sin for only a piece of bread. Mishlei 28:21


+ 260 Go, eat your bread joyfully and drink your wine with a merry heart, for God has already accepted your deeds. Kohelet 9:7


+ 282 I returned and saw under the sun, that the race does not belong to the swift, nor the war to the mighty; neither do the wise have bread, nor do the understanding have riches, nor the knowledgeable, favor; for time and fate will overtake them all. Kohelet 9:11


+ 259 Send forth your bread upon the surface of the water, for after many days you will find it. Kohelet 11:1


+ 320 A visitor is a friend, he brings news, good or bad, which is bread to the hungry minds in lonely places. A real friend who comes to the house is a heavenly messenger, who brings the panis angelorum. Karen Blixen, Out of Africa


+ 210 By the sweat of your brow you will eat bread. Finally you will return to the ground, for it was from the ground that you were taken. You are dust, and to dust you shall return. Bereshit 3:19


+ 180 And this is the size you shall make it: three hundred cubits the length of the ark, fifty cubits its breadth, and thirty cubits its height. Bereshit 6:15


+ 168 Rise, walk in the land, to its length and to its breadth, for I will give it to you. Bereshit 13:17


+ 194 And Malchizedek the king of Salem brought out bread and wine, and he was a priest to the Most High God. Bereshit 14:18


+ 208 And I will take a morsel of bread, and sustain your hearts; after wards you shall pass on, because you have passed by your servant. And they said, So shall you do, as you have spoken. Bereshit 18:5


+ 212 And Abraham arose early in the morning, and he took bread and a leather pouch of water, and he gave them to Hagar, he placed them on her shoulder, and the child, and he sent her away; and she went and wandered in the desert of Beer sheba. Bereshit 21:14


+ 182 And Jacob gave Esau bread and a pottage of lentils, and he ate and drank and arose and left, and Esau despised the birthright. Bereshit 25:34


+ 174 And she gave the tasty foods and the bread that she had made, into the hand of Jacob her son. Bereshit 27:17


+ 195 And Jacob uttered a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and He will guard me on this way, upon which I am going, and He will give me bread to eat and a garment to wear; Bereshit 28:20


+ 185 And Jacob slaughtered a slaughtering on the mountain, and he invited his friends to eat a meal, and they ate bread and lodged on the mountain. Bereshit 31:54


+ 169 So he left all that he had in Joseph's hand, and he knew nothing about what was with him except the bread that he ate; and Joseph had handsome features and a beautiful complexion. Bereshit 39:6


+ 172 And the seven years of famine began, as Joseph had said, and there was famine in all the lands, but throughout the land of Egypt there was bread. Bereshit 41:54


+ 174 When the entire land of Egypt hungered, the people cried out to Pharaoh for bread, but Pharaoh said to all the Egyptians, "Go to Joseph; what he tells you, do." Bereshit 41:55


+ 147 And they prepared the gift until Joseph would come at lunchtime, for they heard that there they would eat bread. Bereshit 43:25


+ 164 And to his father he sent the following: ten he donkeys carrying of the best of Egypt, and ten she donkeys carrying grain, bread, and other food, for his father for the way. Bereshit 45:23


+ 155 And Joseph sustained his father and his brothers and his father's entire household with bread according to the young children. Bereshit 47:12


+ 159 He said to his daughters, So where is he? Why have you left the man? Invite him, and let him eat bread. Shemot 2:20


+ 187 The children of Israel said to them, If only we had died by the hand of the Lord in the land of Egypt, when we sat by pots of meat, when we ate bread to our fill! For you have brought us out into this desert, to starve this entire congregation to death. Shemot 16:3


+ 173 So the Lord said to Moses, Behold! I am going to rain down for you bread from heaven, and the people shall go out and gather what is needed for the day, so that I can test them, whether or not they will follow My teaching. Shemot 16:4


+ 189 And Moses said, When the Lord gives you in the evening meat to eat and bread in the morning with which to become sated, when the Lord hears your complaints, which you are making the people complain against Him, but of what significance are we? Not against us are your complaints, but against the Lord. Shemot 16:8


+ 170 I have heard the complaints of the children of Israel. Speak to them, saying, In the afternoon you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall be sated with bread, and you shall know that I am the Lord, your God. Shemot 16:12


+ 145 When the children of Israel saw it, they said to one another, It is manna, because they did not know what it was, and Moses said to them, It is the bread that the Lord has given you to eat. Shemot 16:15


+ 155 It came to pass on the sixth day that they gathered a double portion of bread, two omers for each one, and all the princes of the community came and reported it to Moses. Shemot 16:22


+ 155 See that the Lord has given you the Sabbath. Therefore, on the sixth day, He gives you bread for two days. Let each man remain in his place; let no man leave his place on the seventh day. Shemot 16:29


+ 159 Moses said, This is the thing that the Lord commanded: Let one omerful of it be preserved for your generations, in order that they see the bread that I fed you in the desert when I took you out of the land of Egypt. Shemot 16:32


+ 159 You shall observe the festival of unleavened bread; for seven days you shall eat unleavened bread as I have commanded you, at the appointed time of the month of springtime, for then you left Egypt, and they shall not appear before Me empty handed. Shemot 23:15


+ 134 And you shall make for it a frame a handbreadth wide all around, and you shall make a golden crown for its frame all around. Shemot 25:25


+ 113 And you shall place on the table showbread before Me at all times. Shemot 25:30


+ 150 And unleavened bread and unleavened loaves mixed with oil, and unleavened wafers anointed with oil; you shall make them out of fine wheat flour. Shemot 29:2


+ 122 And one loaf of bread, one loaf of oil bread, and one wafer from the basket of matzoth that stands before the Lord, Shemot 29:23


+ 133 Aaron and his sons shall eat the flesh of the ram and the bread that is in the basket, at the entrance of the Tent of Meeting. Shemot 29:32


+ 148 If any of the flesh of the perfection offering or of the bread is left over until the next morning, what is left over you shall burn in fire; it shall not be eaten because it is a sacred thing. Shemot 29:34


+ 144 He was there with the Lord for forty days and forty nights; he ate no bread and drank no water, and He inscribed upon the tablets the words of the Covenant, the Ten Commandments. Shemot 34:28


+ 98 The table and its poles and all its implements, and the showbread; Shemot 35:13


+ 122 And he made for it a frame a handbreadth wide all around, and he made a golden crown for its frame all around. Shemot 37:12


+ 96 The table, all its implements and the showbread, Shemot 39:36


+ 122 He set upon it an arrangement of bread before the Lord as the Lord had commanded Moses. Shemot 40:23


+ 128 And Aaron and his sons shall eat whatever is left over from it. It shall be eaten as unleavened bread in a holy place; they shall eat it in the courtyard of the Tent of Meeting. Vayikra 6:9


+ 125 Along with loaves of leavened bread, he shall bring his offering along with his thanksgiving peace offering. Vayikra 7:13


+ 116 Take Aaron and his sons with him, and the garments, and the anointing oil, and the sin offering bull, and the two rams, and the basket of unleavened bread, Vayikra 8:2


+ 124 And out of the basket of unleavened bread that was before the Lord, he took one loaf of unleavened bread, and one loaf of oily bread, and one wafer, and he placed them on top of the fats and the right thigh. Vayikra 8:26


+ 137 And Moses said to Aaron and to his sons, Cook the flesh at the entrance of the Tent of Meeting and eat it there, and the bread that is in the basket of the investiture offerings, as I have commanded, saying, Aaron and his sons shall eat it. Vayikra 8:31


+ 142 And whatever is left over from the flesh and the bread, you shall burn in fire. Vayikra 8:32


+ 125 You shall not eat bread or flour made from parched grain or fresh grain, until this very day, until you bring your God's sacrifice. This is an eternal statute throughout your generations in all your dwelling places. Vayikra 23:14


+ 138 From your dwelling places, you shall bring bread, set aside, two loaves made from two tenths of an ephah; they shall be of fine flour, and they shall be baked leavened, the first offering to the Lord. Vayikra 23:17


+ 150 And associated with the bread, you shall bring seven unblemished lambs in their first year, one young bull, and two rams these shall be a burnt offering to the Lord, along with their meal offering and libations a fire offering with a spirit of satisfaction to the Lord. Vayikra 23:18


+ 121 And the kohen shall wave them in conjunction with the first offering bread as a waving before the Lord, along with the two lambs. They shall be holy to the Lord, and belong to the kohen. Vayikra 23:20


+ 199 And you shall place pure frankincense alongside each stack, and it shall be a reminder for the bread, a fire offering to the Lord. Vayikra 24:7


+ 112 When I break for you the staff of bread, and ten women will bake your bread in one oven, and they will bring back your bread by weight, and you will eat, yet not be satisfied. Vayikra 26:26


+ 122 They shall spread a cloth of blue wool on the Show Table and they shall place on it the forms, spoons, supports, and covering frames; the continual bread can then be placed upon it. Bamidbar 4:7


+ 100 But you shall not rebel against the Lord, and you will not fear the people of that land for they are as our bread. Their protection is removed from them, and the Lord is with us; do not fear them. Bamidbar 14:9


+ 91 And you eat from the bread of the Land, you shall set aside a gift for the Lord. Bamidbar 15:19


+ 95 The people spoke against God and against Moses, "Why have you brought us up out of Egypt to die in this desert, for there is no bread and no water, and we are disgusted with this rotten bread." Bamidbar 21:5


+ 85 On the fifteenth day of this month, a festival begins; you shall eat unleavened bread for seven days. Bamidbar 28:17


+ 125 For only Og, king of Bashan, was left from the remnant of the Rephaim. His bedstead was a bedstead of iron; is it not in Rabbah of the children of Ammon? Nine cubits was its length, and four cubits its breadth, according to the cubit of a man. Devarim 3:11


+ 117 And He afflicted you and let you go hungry, and then fed you with manna, which you did not know, nor did your forefathers know, so that He would make you know that man does not live by bread alone, but rather by, whatever comes forth from the mouth of the Lord does man live. Devarim 8:3


+ 106 A land in which you will eat bread without scarcity, you will lack nothing in it, a land whose stones are iron, and out of whose mountains you will hew copper. Devarim 8:9


+ 109 When I ascended the mountain to receive the stone tablets, the tablets of the covenant which the Lord made with you, I remained on the mountain forty days and forty nights; I neither ate bread nor drank water; Devarim 9:9


+ 110 And I fell down before the Lord as before, forty days and forty nights; I neither ate bread nor drank water, because of all your sins you had committed, by doing evil in the eyes of the Lord to anger Him. Devarim 9:18


+ 115 He executes the judgment of the orphan and widow, and He loves the stranger, to give him bread and clothing. Devarim 10:18


+ 100 You shall not eat leaven with it; for seven days you shall eat with it matzoth, the bread of affliction, for in haste you went out of the land of Egypt, so that you shall remember the day when you went out of the land of Egypt all the days of your life. Devarim 16:3


+ 124 Because they did not greet you with bread and water on the way, when you left Egypt, and because he [the people of Moab] hired Balaam the son of Beor from Pethor in Aram Naharaim against you, to curse you. Devarim 23:5


+ 106 You neither ate bread, nor drank new wine or old wine, in order that you would know that I am the Lord, your God. Devarim 29:5


+ 115 A Miami must-have is the trendy Panther Coffee in Wynwood. I like Alma Mexicana for the ever-popular breakfast burrito. For out-of-this-world Cuban food, the Cubano at Little Bread Cuban Sandwich Co. will satisfy your craving. My friends all love Shorty's Bar-B-Q for the mouth-watering corn on the cob and BBQ, of course. Ivanka Trump


+ 101 This is what I think now; that the natural state of the sentient adult is a qualified unhappiness. I think also that in an adult the desire to be finer in grain than you are, "a constant striving" as those people say who gain their bread by saying it only adds to this unhappiness in the end - that end that comes to our youth and hope. F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Crack-Up


+ 126 One cannot live on potatoes alone. It is said that one wants bread with potatoes. And when there's no bread, a Jew takes his stick, and goes through the village in search of business. Sholom Aleichem


+ 123 Torah Learning for the Creative Individual

Outstanding people who are involved in Torah and who have a talent and inner predilection for ethical and poetic studies, for high thoughts and exalted wisdom, may not suppress or nullify that great desire.

They must broaden it and make it great. They must every day engage in Torah learning that is broad and that transmits knowledge, wisdom and ability.

Such people must dedicate most of their talent to such learning. They should not worry that this dedication may force them to curtail their practical Torah learning, leading them to satisfy themselves with learning that is easy, short and straight, allowing them to simply know the halachah and its reasoning clearly, and allowing them to simply clarify everything in its time with the calm learning of breadth of knowledge in (a) halachah, (b) the basic Talmud discussions and (c) the various approaches of the sages.

This will not keep them from being sharp. True Torah sharpness is naturally born of this learning [mentioned above] of itself, and appears when it is needed.

One does not need to work hard and spend a great deal of time on pilpul. As it is, most pilpul is intended for those [who, not being poetic,] turn to it to fulfill the thirst of their soul for the breadth of Torah and powerful intellectual freedom.

A little pilpul is always good, even for those who are mostly involved in very spiritual matters; but the basic concern of these sensitive souls must be “to open the eyes of the blind; to bring the prisoner out of the jail; to take the man sitting in darkness out of his cell” (Is. 42:7).

Eder Hay’kar, p. 140


+ 112 The Secret of the Sacrificial System

The secret of the sacrificial system is, literally, the elevation of the animal’s animal spirit.

The existence of the Jewish people and its permanence, both spiritual and this-worldly, create a soul-power at its center.

When we elevate and offer a sacrifice of an animal or other kosher sacrifice, we raise these energies [of the sacrifice] to increase the power in the store-house of our people, in our strength for God. Then our spirituality and physicality rise. As a result, the entire world is blessed, because the “community of Israel” is, in general, the center of the world. All of our longing for the restitution of sacrifices with the building of the Temple is literally for the sake of perfecting our people and the world with new powers, exceedingly mighty. This can occur only when the world is improved with the building of the Temple and the building-up of our people on our land, which necessarily comes first, however it may occur, spiritually and physically.

When we gaze at the secrets of the inner Torah, we rise beyond the limited ideas of the thoughts of human intellect. We are not affected by their limited knowledge and grasp of what a sacrifice is. Instead, our thoughts broaden into a supernal breadth. “Open your mouth and I will fill it.”

Mishnat Harav, p. 81


+ 146 The Plain of Halachah and Aggadah

When we begin to take steps upon the plain of halachah and aggadah, a multitude beyond number of unions and harmonies beyond number is drawn out. The universes of heaven and earth, humanity of the flesh and humanity of ideas, with all the wealth hidden in each of them, are then unified. They bring each other to the wished?for action that leads toward complete growth and perfection.

This connection is nothing less than the revelation of the unity that had been hidden within them from the very beginning.

Whoever has not tasted the flavor of halachah has not tasted the flavor of Torah. And whoever has not tasted the flavor of aggadah has not tasted the flavor of­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ fear of sin.

Torah and fear of sin must always accompany one another. The service of Torah learning must be methodically revealed, in an active form, upon this unifying basis—one whose results are very great.

In truth, aggadah always contains a halachic essence. Similarly, halachah contains an inner agaddic content. In the main, the content of aggadah is found in the qualitative form of halachah. And the content of halachah is found in the quantitative form of aggadah. Even without any particular search or awareness, when we learn halachah, we are touched by its hidden content of aggadah; and, when we learn aggadah, we are touched by the pulse of halachah that is folded into the content of the aggadah.

However, not everyone has a properly keen awareness of these two streams—each of which is constantly filled with the content of the other. An alienation between these worlds, which are in essence so joined and twinned together, leads to an unhealthy separation in the nature of deep study and its broadening. It constricts these two areas—halachic and the aggadic—to a narrow arena.

We must clearly bring forth the meeting of these two forces in a rectified form, when each will make the other_s content exceedingly fragrant. Each will profoundly aid the other to bring forth its details and to shine a more brilliant light upon its own general appearance and upon the depth of its own internal logic and what that embraces. The scent of aggadah must make halachah fragrant, in a measure that is well?reasoned and fitting. And aggadah must be given its worth within a framework, with set laws and a clear, defined logic—like the form of a strengthened halachah. With this, the power and freshness of both will be multiplied.

The need that brought the masters of pilpul in previous generations to at times attempt to integrate aggadah and halachah welled forth from this demand for a unification of these forces, which so much act in unison.

We are already called upon to gather together talents and knowledge in order to clarify our learning and all the paths of our lives. In particular, the essence of halachic learning must be broad, composed of the various approaches of the early and later authorities who have grown to be so many over the generations—we very much need that depth and breadth. And we must approach with complete breadth the unity of the contents of halachah and aggadah—which includes the categories of logic and history, ethics and faith, feeling and civility.

And resting upon all of them is a pure phenomenon, one soaked with the dew of the life of the totality of the light of Torah, ready to rest like a beautiful ornament upon all those who learn Torah for its own sake, giving them a special sensitivity and satisfaction of the heart?inspiring joy of Torah.

Orot Hakodesh I, pp. 26?27


+ 135 Torah Scholars Whose Learning Is Their Occupation

Torah scholars whose learning is their occupation must see to it that their path lies correctly before them and that their goal is clear, so that their spirit may be strong and their mind quiet, calm and settled.

How great is the exalted principle, “You are not required to finish, yet neither are you absolved of the work.” Therefore, there is not such a great need to visualize self-encouragement in your Torah-learning service that involves embracing the totality of its knowledge.

This can calm your heart, so that you may learn every topic with a confident and quiet spirit, undisturbed by other things or by worrying in general about attaining total knowledge, which is impossible. Instead, you find your own personal service acceptable.

Nevertheless, you must pave a path for yourself upon which you can still see the complete circumference of the Torah.

In ideology, you must gain clarity about your purpose and the purpose of your desire in your Torah-learning service of God. Also, in practical learning, you must yearn to encompass and incorporate the complete sum of the entire practical teachings that are in the Torah’s practical aspect—as far as you can.

People customarily say that the Torah has no end. In regard to its practical aspect, that is true only within certain parameters—for really, it is possible, when a person goes on a straight path, to attain a total and clear embrace of the entire practical aspect of the Torah.

Those who are great need no explanation for this. But those of middle rank need help, after they arrive at the measure of competent understanding of the depth of halachah, in knowing the form of halachah in a straight and proper way, [which they gain] by serving Torah scholars in correct measure, until they know how to study any Talmudic discussion properly, and how to question and answer in accordance with the path of Torah in the give and take of halachah. Then their main effort must be, first and foremost, to encompass all the halachos of the Rif in their simple meaning, with competent breadth of knowledge. The attainment of this is made much easier by a calm steadfastness.

This service is very sweet in itself, as well as a pleasurable vision that is close to the goal of total encompassing , knowing the complete sum of all the halachos—according to how very close [their study is] to their source in the Talmud in general. Only through the gathering of all the details will the great beauty of the glorious building of the entire practical Torah stand before your eyes.

When you proceed in this fashion every day, continuously, you will add study-times dedicated to an overall mastery of the written Torah, and you will spend set aside times every day for acquiring the wisdom of the aggadah, midrash, ethical works, philosophy and Kabbalah, in proper proportion, and a breadth of time for independent thought, in order to broaden good sensibilities, as well as your set time for learning Talmud quickly every day, and as well as occasional times for clarifying the depth of halachah broadly and engaging in sharp analysis of various topics, in order to broaden your mind and study in-depth, which is crucial for all those who seek the Torah.

When you acquire an encompassing expertise in the halachos of the Rif, there will be born within you the desire to know the halachos clearly. You will learn a great deal of Talmud (Babylonian and Jerusalem), Toseftas and all the words of the Sages, out of an inner recognition of the need for breadth and clarity. The essence of your service must always be in broad learning of the foundations of the halachos and the essentials of the words of Torah, until the perfection of knowledge in all the areas and details will make your awareness whole in all other matters that a person needs. And at that point, people will be inspired by your advice and counsel.

When you proceed in this way, you will also be able to set fixed times for acquiring the wisdom and knowledge that are useful to a person in this world, which broaden the circumference of your knowledge and give you the courage to face the necessities of life. Then you will be pleasing to others and you will find grace in the eyes of God and man.

Orot Hatorah 9:3


+ 113 The Unbordered Light

In every Torah matter, in every aspect of a particular decree, streams the supernal, unbordered light. The total divine lesson can be extracted from every individual law.

To the observer who accustoms his soul to the stream of light, within every legal matter is revealed the content of its innate being, which is filled from the world of bright illumination, until in regards to every law and chapter he can give breadth to a new song, a full song, a full exposition.

This song pours forth continuously even upon every detail of the law, upon every path of discussion within it, until a poetic commentary that gives pleasure and creates Eden can spread across all the Torah, entirely, upon all the Torah—even the this-worldly and legal Torah—besides extending across all the Aggadic material, which shines with an illumination of a fine spiritual light.

Orot Hatorah 4:4


+ 109 A Jewish woman from Chelm went to the market one day to buy herring and a loaf of bread. "How much is it?" she asked the storekeeper. "14 cents," answered the storekeeper to the lady. "14! For what?" asked the Jewish lady. "I think it's 11." The storekeeper explained: The herring costs 7 cents, and the loaf of bread costs 7 cents also. So together it comes to 14 cents." "I know different. To the best of my recollection, 7 and 7 is 11." "What are your saying?" "As far as I know, 7 and 7 is 11...I had already had 4 children when my first husband died. When I married a second time, my second husband also had 4 children from his first wife. After getting married, we had 3 children together. So each of us had 7 children, and together we had 11! Obviously, 7 and 7 is 11."