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+ 98 The Worth of Torah

The Torah is given to Israel as the brightest, broadest, holiest gateway of light—more than the other gateways, which shine with a natural understanding and the spirit of humanity’s natural morality. The gateway of Torah will be opened for us; and, through us, for the entire world.

If we close our ears to the wide-spread voice of God, which calls with vigor through all the natural gateways of light, which is the inheritance of all humanity, because we think that we will find the light of Torah only in a Torah that is torn from any light of the life that is dispersed in the world, in that light’s inner being and in the soul of man in its glory, we do not understand the worth of Torah.

In regard to this, the verse states, “A nation that is foolish and not wise.” And Onkelos translates: “A nation that received the Torah, yet did not grow wise.”

Orot Hatorah 12:5

+ 95 The Torah Is the Spiritual Holy Land

Just as the Community of Israel develops its special qualities to their full extent only in the land of Israel, so does each Jew only develop his special spiritual qualities by means of the Torah.

The Torah is the spiritual holy land, corresponding to the unique nature of the Jewish soul. All other areas of knowledge are like other lands, and relate as such to the soulful greatness of the nation of Israel.

Orot Hatorah 12:7

+ 90 Make the Torah Greater

“Learn Torah for its own sake.” Learn for the sake of the Torah.

God desires that wisdom be made actual. This wisdom is more desirable and uplifted than we can ever understand. Any lack comes from us. Because we are immersed in a physical body, we cannot recognize [wisdom’s] greatness, its strength and uplifted nature.

The wisdom of the Torah is the divine revelation that, in accordance with God’s will, results from our worship and learning. When we learn Torah, we bring its wisdom from potential to actual—as it relates to our spirit. There can be no comparison between the light that is renewed when the Torah is connected to one person’s spirit and when the Torah is connected to another person’s spirit.

So when we learn Torah, we literally make it greater. Since the Holy One, blessed be He, wishes to make the Torah greater, we should learn out of love for the great light that God wishes to be revealed, [in our own desire that it] grow greater and greater.

Even more, we should create Torah thoughts, for this certainly makes the Torah greater—literally, with a double measure of light.

Orot Hatorah 2:1

+ 99 Torah for its Own Sake

What is the essence of learning Torah for its own sake?

In spiritual teachings, this is self-understood. Such teachings are openly concerned with coming close to God and elevation in sanctity. We are uplifted by these teachings.

But what about Torah texts on practical matters?

We must understand that these are all branches and garments of the light of divine honesty and justice. Within their details, we may find the divine soul of the perfection of the world: in life, in physicality and in spirit, in community and in the individual. Once we realize this, light gleams and descends into every detail. Once the feeling of our inner heart and mind is dedicated to the divine and inclusive illumination hidden in the multitude of these practical teachings, we come to an inner revelation within every detail, which shines in accordance with the capability of our individual spirit.

At times, our thought broadens and takes such clear form that we may even express and explicate the spark of divine light that we have understood in some of those details. And in this elevated state, we uplift all the details.

At other times, the matter is revealed only as a subtle glimmer in the chambers of our heart. Even then, however, this lifts our soul to an elevated state, through which all of life is rarified.

In regard to this latter manifestation, our sages stated: “Whoever learns Torah for its own sake merits many things.” And regarding the former inclusive illumination, they added: “And not only that, but the whole world is considered worthwhile for his sake.”

Orot Hatorah 2:2

+ 97 Positive Mindfulness

When we elevate matters with our clarity of intent, our awareness continuously expands in the abundance of a superior reality. At that point, our desire—a desire of eternal love, of great love—for the light of the infinite is scented from the Eden of life. Then we shall gaze and be illumined.

But if our mindfulness is dislodged and grows impoverished, the face of heaven darkens. Beauty turns to mourning and to barrenness. Then that clarifying process that comes from heaven, which demands the right to play its role, depresses the special mission of humanity. It dulls the light of mindfulness and the complete contents of a full life. This clarifying process, reaching to the root of all being, is a necessity: deeply implanted and flowing without cease. Now, the wellsprings of the flow of life dry up because our hands are feeble in dealing with the supernal Torah.

But everything returns to its light and to its shining life when we engage in supernal repentance filled with knowledge and positive mindfulness, illumined with the light of Torah contained within the wisdom of the Jewish people, which is the inheritance of our patriarchs and which is filled with an eternal glory.

The text of the blessing, “He planted eternal life within us,” refers to the oral Torah: in all its levels and in the totality of its beauty.

Orot Hatorah 3:2

+ 95 One Command

The essence of knowledge is that the totality of the Torah should cleave to our hearts so strongly and with such clear understanding that this totality will powerfully pour forth, resulting in a powerful, individual concern for every mitzvah and detail of the Torah. This will be like the powerful life-force that pours forth from the heart, spreading to every limb.

This is not the case when there is no true, all-encompassing knowledge. Then everything in the Torah is separate. This creates confusion in our basic understanding of the Torah. It prevents our service of love and generosity. Then “the word of Hashem shall be for you a command and a command, a line and a line.”

We must recognize the words of the Torah as one law and one command.

Orot Hatorah 3:3

+ 98 The Voice of the Living God

A profound recognition of the divine purpose within the Torah, as well as within prophecy and holy inspiration in general, brings our thought to observe their unity. We realize that the Pentateuch encompasses the other writings of the Bible, and that the Pentateuch in its supernal holiness is enveloped within the voice of the living God.

As long as our soul lives, we heed and hear this great voice, which penetrates all of the Torah.

Throughout all its generations, the people of Israel has recognized this great principle of the oneness of the Torah. We cling to that with all our heart and spirit. We know that God’s Torah is perfect. We know that the essence of our unified soul wells from this true Torah’s unified light, that the light of the one God appears within us with a clarifying prominence: black fire upon white fire.

And we attribute all of our original nature to this living source. We are certain that this is a tower of strength for us. We know that the entire Torah is merely one name of the Holy One, blessed be He: one name, one expression, one statement, with none else, for everything is contained within Him.

Orot Hatorah 4:1

+ 88 Contained Within the Torah

The entire Torah consists of the names of the Holy One, blessed be He. Every good attribute, every mark of civility, is contained within the Torah. Every wisdom is rooted in the Torah. Indeed, the name of the Holy One, blessed be He, shines within everything good—whether in an individual or a group.

There is a difference between a person who knows that everything consists of light sparkling from the name of the Holy One, blessed be He, or a person who does not know. Nevertheless, this difference is merely a matter of degree.

The essence of the matter depends upon the inner core of our will: to whatever degree it corresponds to goodness. Only in this way can we find the light of the Righteous One of the world, He Who is cloaked in the foundation of all, in wisdom and kindness, so as to make the spiritual and physical visions of existence correspond: that is to say, the ideal of what existence could be and the actual coming about of that ideal. The actualization is the outcome of the ideal, and consummates it.

Orot Hatorah 4:2

+ 101 A Love of the Entirety

Every individual matter in the Torah flows from the entire Torah: from the written Torah, the oral Torah, any good learning, any mitzvah, and any good trait.

There are differences between these levels. But the love and joy in performing the mitzvos and in learning Torah for its own sake must be a love of the entirety: a love of all the light, life, holiness and supernal spirituality—literally, of all of it. It is stored and hidden within whatever detail we are involved with. And it grows prominent due to the content of that detail, in all the manifestations of its light, glory and holy radiance.

Orot Hatorah 4:3

+ 99 When Your Soul Connects

When your soul connects with the supernal light of the Torah, its smallest details become beloved to your soul. Then your desire for the Torah spreads to every letter of its subtleties and the subtle distinctions made by the rabbis, as they spread and branch forth.

Orot Hatorah 5:1

+ 88 The Joy That the Torah Gives us

The joy that the Torah gives us comes from the preponderance of light within the letters of the Torah, filled as they are with the life-force of divine pleasure. These letters pervade the totality of our soul with the light of life and the joy of heaven.

This is a joy that flows from the letters themselves, which are already comprehended by the soul. But more than that, it flows from the glorious spiritual life-force that constantly cascades from the supernal wellsprings.

That life-force is much more exalted than the letters that are comprehended by the soul with which we can communicate. The light of those letters’ hidden joy is great, filled with a tranquillity and wondrous pleasure which nothing can equal.

Orot Hatorah 5:2

+ 85 The Encompassing Light

At times, we cannot learn because we are on a level where the encompassing light that transcends letters shines upon us, and we cannot constrict ourselves within the letters of what we are learning.

When we accept this illumination in holiness and humility, we can learn with great joy and a very clear understanding.

Orot Hatorah 5:3

+ 81 The Luminosity of Repentance

Corresponding to the luminosity of our repentance before learning Torah is the luminosity of our understanding.

To the extent that our will rises, so does our mind rise. To the extent that our will is luminous, so is our mind luminous.

Orot Hatorah 6:2

+ 114 Far from Words of Torah

There are a number of causes that can keep us far from words of Torah and prevent them from entering our hearts. We must always know the cause of such an obstacle when we feel it, so that we may know how to remove it and allow our heart to be open to a clear connection with the Torah’s words.

If we do not know the correct cause, we might busy ourselves in extensive work to remove some other cause, which is not presently impeding us. Then the real cause that keeps us from clinging to Torah will remain in place, and we will stay confused.

Some of these causes are spiritual; others physical. Some stem from inadequate preparation of the holy; others from inadequate preparation of the this-worldly.

Orot Hatorah 7:1

+ 82 The Neglect of Torah

The “neglect of Torah” is different for everyone, each on his level. Someone who can rise mentally to a great level but who is indolent or afraid and thus rejects his lofty state, allowing himself to remain low, is rejecting the Torah of God for which he is suited.

In regard to this, the rabbis stated that “God overlooked idolatry, immorality and bloodshed, but not the rejection of the Torah.”

Orot Hatorah 7:2

+ 88 We Will Do and We Will Listen

“We will do and we will listen.”

“We will do” comes before “we will listen.”

As a result, we appreciate the Torah for its divinely unique aspect more than we might appreciate it solely for any necessary practical advantage that exists in learning.

First comes “we will do.” This encompasses our connection to the value of practical learning.

But then comes “we will listen.” This shields our connection to the transcendent value of Torah learning.

Orot Hatorah 8:1

+ 97 The Essential Core

When we learn in holiness, our will and mind grow refined. The divine illumination comes from the essential core of our soul and fills its being entirely. Then spiritual life spreads out to the ends of its being, just as blood courses to all parts of the body.

But secular learning, of whatever discipline, only enlivens the particular topic with which it deals.

This is the basic difference between the holy and secular in regard to quantitative worth. But from the aspect of qualitative worth, the difference is infinitely more exalted.

Orot Hatorah 6:1

+ 92 The Inner Character

The Torah literally makes the Jewish soul.

Wisdom in general, that which is outside the concepts of Torah, makes the human soul.

When we gaze at the character of the core of the human soul, we will find the spirit of Israel alive within it. In the inner character of all betterment and wisdom, we will find the light of Torah.

Orot Hatorah 12:4

+ 87 The Written Torah and the Oral Torah

We receive the written Torah through the most elevated and inclusive conception within our souls. From the midst of our souls, we sense the blaze and beauty of that living, encompassing light of all existence. It makes us soar higher than all logic and intellect. We sense a supernal Godly spirit hovering upon us, touching yet not touching, flying next to our lives and above them, gilding them with its light. This light blazes, sparkles and penetrates everything. It permeates whatever is under the heavens. This great light was not created by the spirit of the Jewish people. Rather, it was created by the spirit of God, the Creator of all. This living Torah is the foundation of the creation of all universes.

With the oral Torah, we descend to life. We feel that we are receiving the supernal light in the second conduit within our soul: the conduit that advances toward the life of action. We sense that the spirit of the nation, bound like the flame to the coal with the light of the true Torah, has, with its unique character, fashioned the unique form of the oral Torah. Without a doubt, this Torah of man is encompassed within the Torah of God. It too is the Torah of God. It cannot be that this flow of life through all portals could be hidden from the keen eye of [Moses, who received this Torah,] who gazed through the clear lens, who was trusted in all the house of God. As the sages stated, whatever a thoughtful student will one day conceive of was told to Moses on Sinai.

These two lights make one complete world, in which heaven and earth are nourished.

Orot Hatorah 1:1

+ 86 The Words of the Scribes

The oral Torah exists in the essential character of the Jewish people, which acquired its blessing with the revelation from heaven of the written Torah.

In its revealed state, the oral Torah is lower than the written Torah. The chief means of finding its path is the written Torah, which is the supernal relationship of the Jewish people with supernal divinity, with the goal of goals, with victory and splendor in the universes and higher than them all.

But in the inner form, is it not the case that the Torah is given to Israel for the sake of our inner, supernal unique being? It is this divine, hidden, unique being that caused the Torah to be revealed to us from heaven.

And so in its root the oral Torah is higher than the root of the hidden Torah.

“The words of the scribes are more beloved than the words of the Torah.”

Orot Hatorah 1:2

+ 85 The Two Companions

The oral Torah draws sustenance in a hidden manner from the heavenly, and in a revealed manner from the earthly.

The land of Israel must be built up, with all the people of Israel dwelling upon it in a well-ordered manner: with the Temple and a kingdom, with cohanim and prophecy, with judges and officers and all their accouterments. Then the oral Torah will live in all the glow of its beauty. It will flower and bloom. With its entire measure, it will connect to the written Torah.

In exile, these twins were separated. The written Torah rose to the heights of holiness, and the oral Torah descended to the very depths. Nevertheless, [the oral Torah] receives a silent sustenance from the light of the written Torah, from its past uncultivated growth, which suffices to allow it to exist, [although] with a constrained life.

Every day, [the oral Torah] descends and falls. But one day the breeze will blow and the light of life will arrive from the treasury of eternal redemption. Then Israel will grow strong. We will be planted upon our land and improve in all the magnificence of our structure. Then the oral Torah will begin to blossom, from the depth of its root. It will rise higher and higher. The light of the written Torah will shine the rays of its light upon it anew: “new for the morning.” Then these companions will unite in the realm of their bridal chamber.

And the light of the soul of God, the Life of worlds, which is revealed in the revival of Israel (when our horn is lifted), will shine with the light of the seven days of the light of the sun and the light of the moon combined.

Then their light will be straight and penetrating, connecting one extremity to the other. It will respond to the land and the nation in every manifestation of life. The light of the moon will be like the light of the sun. And the light of the sun will shine sevenfold, like the light of the seven days, on the day that God binds the fracture of His nation and heals the illness of its wound.

Orot Hatorah 1:3

+ 96 The Business for Which We Are Suited

Every one of us must engage in the business for which we are suited.

This is particularly true regarding Torah learning. At times, circumstances may make it difficult for you to stand firm in what your heart desires. But nevertheless, you must stay strong and not relinquish that which is suited for your particular spirit.

Orot Hatorah 9:1

+ 107 Torah Scholars Whose Learning Is Their Occupation

Torah scholars whose learning is their occupation must see to it that their path lies correctly before them and that their goal is clear, so that their spirit may be strong and their mind quiet, calm and settled.

How great is the exalted principle, “You are not required to finish, yet neither are you absolved of the work.” Therefore, there is not such a great need to visualize self-encouragement in your Torah-learning service that involves embracing the totality of its knowledge.

This can calm your heart, so that you may learn every topic with a confident and quiet spirit, undisturbed by other things or by worrying in general about attaining total knowledge, which is impossible. Instead, you find your own personal service acceptable.

Nevertheless, you must pave a path for yourself upon which you can still see the complete circumference of the Torah.

In ideology, you must gain clarity about your purpose and the purpose of your desire in your Torah-learning service of God. Also, in practical learning, you must yearn to encompass and incorporate the complete sum of the entire practical teachings that are in the Torah’s practical aspect—as far as you can.

People customarily say that the Torah has no end. In regard to its practical aspect, that is true only within certain parameters—for really, it is possible, when a person goes on a straight path, to attain a total and clear embrace of the entire practical aspect of the Torah.

Those who are great need no explanation for this. But those of middle rank need help, after they arrive at the measure of competent understanding of the depth of halachah, in knowing the form of halachah in a straight and proper way, [which they gain] by serving Torah scholars in correct measure, until they know how to study any Talmudic discussion properly, and how to question and answer in accordance with the path of Torah in the give and take of halachah. Then their main effort must be, first and foremost, to encompass all the halachos of the Rif in their simple meaning, with competent breadth of knowledge. The attainment of this is made much easier by a calm steadfastness.

This service is very sweet in itself, as well as a pleasurable vision that is close to the goal of total encompassing , knowing the complete sum of all the halachos—according to how very close [their study is] to their source in the Talmud in general. Only through the gathering of all the details will the great beauty of the glorious building of the entire practical Torah stand before your eyes.

When you proceed in this fashion every day, continuously, you will add study-times dedicated to an overall mastery of the written Torah, and you will spend set aside times every day for acquiring the wisdom of the aggadah, midrash, ethical works, philosophy and Kabbalah, in proper proportion, and a breadth of time for independent thought, in order to broaden good sensibilities, as well as your set time for learning Talmud quickly every day, and as well as occasional times for clarifying the depth of halachah broadly and engaging in sharp analysis of various topics, in order to broaden your mind and study in-depth, which is crucial for all those who seek the Torah.

When you acquire an encompassing expertise in the halachos of the Rif, there will be born within you the desire to know the halachos clearly. You will learn a great deal of Talmud (Babylonian and Jerusalem), Toseftas and all the words of the Sages, out of an inner recognition of the need for breadth and clarity. The essence of your service must always be in broad learning of the foundations of the halachos and the essentials of the words of Torah, until the perfection of knowledge in all the areas and details will make your awareness whole in all other matters that a person needs. And at that point, people will be inspired by your advice and counsel.

When you proceed in this way, you will also be able to set fixed times for acquiring the wisdom and knowledge that are useful to a person in this world, which broaden the circumference of your knowledge and give you the courage to face the necessities of life. Then you will be pleasing to others and you will find grace in the eyes of God and man.

Orot Hatorah 9:3

+ 96 To Expel Coarseness

It is an established principle that if you see that your success lies in the Torah’s spirituality and mystical teachings, and if you find learning halachah in depth difficult, your inner obligation is to set aside the majority of your time to that study that fits your spirit.

Similarly, if you see that learning the secrets of the Torah is sanctifying you, is raising your spirit and bringing you close to holiness with a feeling in your heart and inner mind, and you do not see this desirable fruit from your exoteric studies—and, more than that, they do not suffice to expel from you the coarseness of your proclivities that you sense in your spirit—this is a definite sign that your rectification lies in learning your portion of the inner light of the Torah’s mysticism.

When you feel within yourself such a clarity and purity that the exoteric learning will also support you in [rising in] holiness, you will be able to expand your boundary until you will fulfill your purpose well and come back to gain more pleasure in the teachings of the supernal secrets “for sustenance, for satiety and for fine garments” (Isaiah 23:18). When everything is for the sake of heaven, with pure intent, “He does not despise the suffering of the impoverished” (Psalms 22:25).

Orot Hatorah 10:3

+ 93 A Double Joy

At times, when we learn small matters with such great feeling that they impress our spirit as though they were the highest of the high, our consciousness grows corporeal, and the wings of our spirit are severed.

The proper path is to learn every topic with a joy that contains a double feeling.

The first is a feeling of supernal greatness, since every spiritual twig makes whole the entire Tree of Life. In this light, everything is great.

The second is a feeling that in the particular contents of all learning material, particularly of the Torah, there is a very positive value that is worth being appreciated with the joy of respect in accordance with its value.

Then the fire from above and the fire from below join to illuminate and warm our soul.

Orot Hatorah 9:9

+ 99 You Are Capable of Perception

It may be that you cannot visualize the subtle aspect of those exalted topics dealt with in the secrets of Torah and in all mystical concepts. Still, your general feeling and spiritual refinement are capable of perception. This comes as a result of your wisdom-giving soul’s essential recognition and the sense of faith rooted within your spirit.

You may only need to use your intellect to purify concepts, so that they will not mislead you, contradicting clear awareness and the pure recognitions of refined faith.

Then spiritual impressions will remain with you as thoughts that uplift your spirit and raise it to a supernal divine sphere, a sphere that is the source of soulful happiness and brightness for both the individual and the community.

Orot Hatorah 10:6

+ 88 The Entire World Will Rise

The Torah is bound with the spirit of Israel. The sheer spirit of Israel is filled with everything: the light of God, the purpose of creation, the source of souls.

When the Torah grows stronger, when its knowledge spreads, when its light shines, when its feelings grow deep in the midst of every soul, then the divine light will spread throughout the world; it will grow more magnificent and exalted; and the entire world will rise with the elevation of those individuals who lift the spirit.

Orot Hatorah 12:1

+ 120 Dark Alleys Shine

Once we learn much hidden Torah, whatever we understand and learn from the revealed Torah shines with a precious light.

Then the hidden Torah, with its special quality, appears in all those topics that the revealed Torah discusses.

This is found in the Jerusalem Talmud: since its authors were pious, their Torah was “blessed.” In contrast, the words of the Babylonian Talmud are merely “kept.” It seems that the Jerusalem Talmud deals with more elevated, pious people. Because of them, the Torah grows and becomes glorious. This is due to the appearance of attainments of holiness, starting from a small beginning and developing into great and powerful rivers. These people attain the light of Torah by prayer and deep study, as well as before and after learning. Such people constitute the body of Torah and the soul of Torah.

In this regard, there is a difference between the air of the land of Israel (where the holy spirit can flow upon the content of Jewish law) and elsewhere (where the holy spirit can spread openly only in aggadah, whereas Jewish law is judged by human intellect).

“‘In the dark places, You have placed me’ (Eichah 3:6)—this is the Babylonian Talmud” (Sanhedrin 24a). But from the midst of darkness, great light will sprout: “The nation that walks in darkness has seen a great light, those who dwell in a land of the shadow of death—light has shone upon them” (Is. 9:1). [“These are masters of the Talmud, who have seen great light, for the Holy One, blessed be He, illumines their eyes with what is forbidden and allowed, what is ritually unclean and clean” (Midrash Tanchuma Noach).]

In this way, these people bring down to the lowly avenues of life the illumination of God’s supernal Presence. In this way, they cause multitudinous dark alleys to shine. This aids numbers of those who are distant come, approach and connect to the supernal light of the glow of Torah in its might, the Torah of the land of Israel: “‘The gold of that land is good’ (Bereishis 2:12)—there is no Torah like the Torah of the land of Israel, and no wisdom like the wisdom of the land of Israel” (Bereishis Rabbah 16).

Orot Hatorah 13:1

+ 80 The Neglect of Torah

On occasion, the times during which we neglect Torah act to illumine our eyes so that we may recognize the content of the holiness of the Torah and the depth of life that it pours forth upon those who learn it.

Oros Hatorah 7:3

+ 86 Marked Borders

All spiritual concepts in the Torah are like borders that have been marked so that we may come to them. We do so by employing the means that lead to them with the proper preparations.

If we will want to come to them paying no mind to the fundamental nature of these preparations, we will attain not truthful but illusory matters.

“The lazy man has hidden his hand in the plate; neither will he bring it to his mouth.”

Orot Hatorah 8:4

+ 95 The Root of the Torah

When a person rises to elevated thoughts and arranges his paths in accordance with them in the depths of his spirit, he comes to the root of the Torah in its elevated form, whose goal is to raise the world to its intended elevation.

Then of itself, all that he learns of the details of the Torah is not something new to him. Rather, it is like a remembrance of something that already exists in his potential.

And this is the inner meaning of the statement that “since they are pious, their Torah lasts.”

Orot Hatorah 6:4

+ 84 The Sweetness

A diminution of the sweetness of the pleasantness of Torah results from something lacking in the Jewish nature of the soul.

[The soul] must be rectified by means of self-growth directed toward this lack.

And when our mind is engaged in rectifying this lack, immediately the supernal light of the holy nature of our soul again shines, and the sweetness of the Torah again begins to be revealed.

Orot Hatorah 7:4

+ 93 Horses of Fire

“‘Horses of fire’ refers to the letters of the Torah” (Introduction, Tikunei Zohar).

Sometimes an idea is so powerful that a person cannot grasp it with his own strength. But his inspiration is magnified when he bonds with the letter in the Torah. And that capability rises much beyond his own strength, like the swift and certain passage of a chariot.

There is a type of person who travels only by foot. He makes his way using the might of his deep study of the Torah in a general fashion. He is not aided in understanding matters by means of the letters of the Torah.

There is another type of person who lacks the strength to walk. Instead, he travels exclusively upon the letters of the Torah, [‘the horses of fire’]—even in those matters that are simple, where a healthy man should travel by foot, using his own ability.

And there is another type of person. He goes by foot whenever he can. And when he does utilize the letters of the Torah, it is not out of weakness. Rather, he is like a man riding gloriously upon a horse, lending a crown to [the Torah] that he is involved with, or riding to a place that he could not have reached with his own ability, but only, in addition, by means of seeking out the letters of the Torah.

Orot Hatorah 5:4

+ 92 When Your Healthy Heart Expands

When your healthy heart expands with the might of the strength of the pulse, the flow of blood through the finest and most distant blood vessels, and when your mind is so strong that it can understand the foundation of Torah and its principles, how its many details are a necessary outcome of its totality, then your outlook grows clear and all-encompassing, and you attain a great love and feelings of respect and appreciation of holiness for every matter and precise detail in the Torah.

Orot Hatorah 3:4

+ 93 The Unbordered Light

In every Torah matter, in every aspect of a particular decree, streams the supernal, unbordered light. The total divine lesson can be extracted from every individual law.

To the observer who accustoms his soul to the stream of light, within every legal matter is revealed the content of its innate being, which is filled from the world of bright illumination, until in regards to every law and chapter he can give breadth to a new song, a full song, a full exposition.

This song pours forth continuously even upon every detail of the law, upon every path of discussion within it, until a poetic commentary that gives pleasure and creates Eden can spread across all the Torah, entirely, upon all the Torah—even the this-worldly and legal Torah—besides extending across all the Aggadic material, which shines with an illumination of a fine spiritual light.

Orot Hatorah 4:4

+ 105 Enriching the Community of Israel

One way of learning Torah for its own sake is [to do so in order] to enrich the Community of Israel with great spiritual powers.

The more that the light of Torah increases, so that with one heart the people of Israel appreciate and respect it, the more that the fundamental power of our nation gains strength and firmness.

And the individual soul of the person who brings about this universal blessing itself grows and gains glory, gains completion and beauty, with a multitude of fresh branches. And it sends forth a multitude of powerful roots, through which it takes root amidst the roots of the Tree of true life. To the degree of its purity and might, this soul recognizes and feels the depth of the pleasantness of the good taste of a fulfilled life.

“Your palate is like good wine. It goes directly to my beloved. It causes the lips of the sleeping to murmur” (Shir Hashirim 7:10).

Orot Hatorah 2:4